Postcards Of The Past

Old Postcards & Photographs

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Blackpool Victoria Pier 1900s

Blackpool’s Victoria Pier opened in 1893 and was renamed South Pier in 1930. The Grand Pavilion on the end of the pier was destroyed in a fire in 1964 and replaced a few months later by a new theatre. The new theatre was subsequently demolished in 1998 to make way for new white knuckle rides.

Today the promenade to the south of the pier is heavily built up with amusement arcades and the Sandcastle Water Park, although the grassed area (Flagstaff Gardens) seen in the photo is still there.

Although postally unused, we can make an educated guess that this postcard was published between 1902 (when divided backs were introduced) and 1918 (when the cost of sending a card rose from ½d to 1d).

Bunker Street, Freckleton

Early 20th century…2009…Source: Google Maps

 

Blackpool Pleasure Beach 1929

Blackpool Pleasure Beach opened in 1896. It sits on a 42 acre site on land mostly reclaimed from the beach, at the south end of Blackpool Promenade. The photo above must have been taken after 1923 when the Big Dipper (visible in the top right) was constructed.

Posted by John (Wain) staying at 78 Rydal Mount, Lytham Road, Blackpool to Mr J Wain, Conway, 28 The Grove, Wheatley Hills, Doncaster on 20 August 1929.

Blackpool Promenade 1918

Blackpool North Parade around 1918

Published by E T W Dennis & Sons Ltd.
Sent by Minnie Walker to Mrs Best of 18 Cross Flatts Drive, Beeston, Leeds on 8 August 1918.

Britannia Bridge Lions

Britannia Bridge Lions

The Britannia Bridge connects Anglesey to the Welsh mainland. The original bridge, designed by Robert Stephenson, opened on 5 March 1850 to carry trains running to Holyhead Station.
The entrance to the original bridge was adorned by four large limestone lions, two at each end, sculpted by John Thomas. The lions remain in place today, but are sadly hidden by the new bridge and are only visible from the train.

On 23 May 1970, children playing inside the train tunnel dropped a burning torch which ignited the wooden roof of the tunnel. The fire spread along the bridge and severely damaged the metal structure, leading to the bridge requiring rebuilding. The current bridge opened to trains in 1972, with the road carrying the A55 running above the trains tracks opening in 1980.

The postcard was published Woolstone Brothers under the name The Milton Photogravure Series.

L&NWR Irish Boat Train

The Irish Boat Express crossing the Britannia Bridge over the Menai Straits on its way Holyhead. On the picture you can still see the lions, although the Lions are still in place they are no longer visible, having been hidden when the bridge was rebuilt following a fire in 1970.

The postcard was published by Raphael Tuck and Sons.

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